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AngularJS: File names

As a developer working with CiviCRM-Angular, you write Angular modules -- these modules are composed of various JS/CSS/HTML files which define the services, directives, controllers, and routes.

For sake of predictability, these files are placed in the ang/ folder, and they follow a naming convention.

How does this work with civix?

When you generate Angular code via civix, the files are named according to convention.

One file, ang/{mymodule}.ang.php, provides instructions for the file-loader. It lists any files which match the naming convention.

What if I don't use civix? What if my code doesn't follow the naming convention?

The file-loader needs some information about the name and location of your AngularJS code, but you don't need to follow the convention. You can configure it via hook. See: AngularJS: Loading.

Abridged convention

The abridged convention applies to small Angular modules with a narrow purpose -- such as defining a singular service or directive. These modules only have 2 or 3 files.

  • ang/{mymodule}.ang.php - General metadata about the module (per hook_civicrm_angularModules).
  • ang/{mymodule}.js - All Javascript for the module.
  • ang/{mymodule}.css - All CSS for the module (if applicable).
  • ang/{mymodule}.md - Developer documentation about the module (if applicable).

Full convention

The full convention applies to bigger Angular modules which serve a broader purpose -- such as defining a new screen with a series of related directives, controllers, and services. Each of these elements may have multiple aspects (JS/HTML/CSS).

Module Files

  • ang/{mymodule}.ang.php - General metadata about the module (per hook_civicrm_angularModules).
  • ang/{mymodule}.js - General metadata about the module.
  • ang/{mymodule}.css - General CSS that applies throughout the module (if applicable).
  • ang/{mymodule}.md - Developer documentation about the module (if applicable).

Directive Files

  • ang/{mymodule}/{FooBar}.js - The declaration and logic for a directive named mymoduleFooBar or <div mymodule-foo-bar>.
  • ang/{mymodule}/{FooBar}.html - The main/default template for the directive (if applicable).
  • ang/{mymodule}/{FooBar}/{Extra}.html - If you have multiple templates used by the same directive (e.g. via ng-include or conditional logic), then put them in a subdir.
  • ang/{mymodule}/{FooBar}.css - Any CSS specifically intended for mymoduleFooBar (if applicable).
  • ang/{mymodule}/{FooBar}.md - Developer documentation about the directive (if applicable).

Controller Files (These follow the same convention as directives, but they have the suffix Ctrl.)

  • ang/{mymodule}/{FooBar}Ctrl.js - The declaration and logic for a controller named MymoduleFooBarCtrl.
  • ang/{mymodule}/{FooBar}Ctrl.html - The main/default template for the controller (if applicable).
  • ang/{mymodule}/{FooBar}Ctrl/{Extra}.html - If you have multiple templates used with the same controller (e.g. via ng-include or conditional logic), then put them in a subdir.
  • ang/{mymodule}/{FooBar}Ctrl.css - Any CSS specifically intended for MymoduleFooBarCtrl (if applicable).
  • ang/{mymodule}/{FooBar}Ctrl.md - Developer documentation about the controller (if applicable).

Service Files

  • ang/{mymodule}/{FooBar}.js - The declaration and logic for a service named mymoduleFooBar.
  • ang/{mymodule}/{FooBar}.md - Developer documentation about the service (if applicable).

Tip: Use tilde (~) to load HTML templates

When writing code for Angular, you might use an expression like {templateUrl: 'https://example.org/FooBar.html'}. However, constructing a full URL that works in every Civi deployment would be complex. Instead, use the tilde prefix. For example, {templateUrl: '~/mymodule/FooBar.html'}.